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National Policy Summit & FUTURES Assembly

Reverse Transfer (1) Futures 1

2016 Community College FUTURES Assembly

January 24-26, 2016

Hilton Walt Disney World, Orlando, FL

Celebrating 22 years of recognizing outstanding Bellwether Award winning programs

2016 Futures Assembly Opening General Session Announcement


The 2016 Community College Futures Assembly is glad to introduce this year’s keynote presenter: Tina Seelig, PhD, Professor of the Practice in the Department of Management Science and Engineering (MS&E), and Executive Director of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program at Stanford University School of Engineering. Dr. Seelig earned her PhD in Neuroscience at Stanford Medical School, and has been a management consultant, entrepreneur, and author of 17 books, including Insight Out: Get Ideas Out of Your Head and Into the World,  inGenius: A Crash Course on Creativity, and What I Wish I Knew When I Was 20. Along with many teaching awards, she is the recipient of the Gordon Prize from the National Academy of Engineering, the Olympus Innovation Award, and the Silicon Valley Visionary Award.

Bellwether Awards

The Bellwether Awards annually recognize outstanding and innovative programs and practices that are successfully leading community colleges into the future. 30 outstanding colleges will be selected to present their innovative practices at the 2016 Community College Futures Assembly in January. From each of the three categories below, one college will be selected to win the prestigious Bellwether Award.  The application deadline is October 19, 2015.

Sponsored by


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“No Ordinary Pathways: Understanding the Unique Student Journey


January 23 & 24, 2016

Hilton Downtown Disney, Orlando FL

Sponsored by



A gathering of higher education officials from the national, state and institution levels with an interest in facilitating the reverse transfer of credits back to associate degree granting institutions to facilitate greater numbers of students attaining a higher education credential.

Session details will be posted soon. 

Cosponsored by the National Student Clearinghouse and the Institute of Higher Education at the University of Florida, the 2016 National Policy Summit will bring in state delegations, researchers, policy makers to share their Reverse Transfer experiences. While we are still waiting on several presenters to confirm their schedule arrangements, we are fortunate to have the following presenters joining us on Jan 23 and 24.


Ricardo D. Torres

Torres-Picture Ricardo D. Torres joined the National Student Clearinghouse as its President and CEO in 2008. Under his leadership the Clearinghouse has continued to successfully extend its’ mission delivery of service to education, which today comprises nearly 3,700 higher education institutions and over 8,500 high schools, school districts, and 43 states executing over one billion electronic transactions annually, saving the education community over $700 million a year. The Clearinghouse is a leader in advocating privacy, transparency and responsible use of data to provide better understanding of student educational pathway performance to the benfit of  students, institutions and policymakers.

Prior to joining the Clearinghouse, Mr. Torres spent his career in the private sector, both in the U.S. and abroad, spanning several industry sectors, including health care, financial services, and fast-moving consumer goods in leadership positions, including finance, sales, marketing, operations, technology, and executive management. He has been employed by a number of well-known companies, such as PepsiCo, Philip Morris/Kraft Foods and Capital One.

Mr. Torres has been an active board member of the John Tyler Community College Foundation for the past 17 years and serves on the Boards of the National College Access Network (NCAN), and the Cesar Chavez Public Charter Schools for Public Policy. He also sat on the Board of the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), where he is courrently on their Commission on Economic and Workforce Development. He was a founding member and sits on the Executive Committee of the Groningen Declaration Network Group, a multi-national group of leaders dedicated to developing a trusted international data exchange ecosystem. He was a recipient of the Washington Business Journal’s 2013 Minority Business Leader Award. Mr. Torres holds an MBA in International Finance from Georgetown University and undergraduate degrees in both Marketing and Management from Manhattan College.


Thomas Bailey

Tom Bailey  Thomas Bailey is the George and Abby O’Neill Professor of Economics and Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. He is also Director of the Community College Research Center (CCRC) and of the National Center for Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment (CAPSEE), established in 2011 and funded by a grant from the Institute for Education Sciences. From 2006 to 2012, Dr. Bailey directed another IES‐funded center, the National Center for Postsecondary Research. With support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Dr. Bailey established the Community College Research Center (CCRC) at Teachers College in 1996 and since 1992 has been Director of the Institute on Education and the Economy (IEE) at Teachers College. In June 2010, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan appointed him chair of the Committee on Measures of Student Success, which developed recommendations for community colleges to comply with completion rate disclosure requirements under the Higher Education Opportunity Act. Dr. Bailey received the AERA Division J (Postsecondary Education) Exemplary Research Award in 2012 and in the same year was elected as a member of the National Academy of Education.

His articles have appeared in a wide variety of education, policy‐oriented and academic journals, and he has authored or co‐authored several books on the employment and training of immigrants and the extent and effects of on‐the‐job training. His most recent book, co‐edited with Vanessa Morest, is Defending the Community College Equity Agenda (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006). Other books include Working Knowledge: Work‐Based Learning and Education Reform (Routledge, 2004), co‐authored with Katherine Hughes and David Moore; Manufacturing Advantage (Cornell University Press, 2000), written with Eileen Appelbaum, Peter Berg, and Arne Kalleberg; and The Double Helix of Education and the Economy (IEE, 1992), co‐authored with Sue Berryman. Dr. Bailey holds a Ph.D. in labor economics from MIT


Why gather to discuss Reverse Transfer?

  • Recent NSC research indicates that in the 10 years between 2003 and 2013, 2 million individuals were enrolled for at least two years of college, transferred at least once but left college without a credential.  The enrollment patterns for 40% of these students indicated that they attended institutions in multiple states.

  • If students have earned the credits to qualify for a degree they should receive that degree even if the order in which they took their classes was not what was originally envisioned.  The financial reward for attaining an associate degree as opposed to only a high school diploma makes the reverse transfer process a bridge for many of these students to a better future.

  • A growing number of states are passing legislation that mandates that the public higher education institutions within their states engage in reverse transfer.  In other states individual institutions are becoming involved with reverse transfer without the motivation of legislative action.  States currently engaged in reverse transfer activities include Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, New York, North Carolina, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, Oregon, Tennessee, Texas, and Wisconsin.  More states are becoming involved so this list is not comprehensive.

  • It is clear that traditional approaches to higher education will not lead to meeting the higher education attainment goals set by the Obama Administration, multiple education focused foundations and other organizations or the goals set by individual states.  Reverse transfer is one strategy that has the potential to provide significant progress toward attaining these goals.

 What can participants expect to gain from attendance?

  • A national perspective on how reverse transfer fits among the strategies to increase attainment of higher education credentials.

  • Multiple state level perspectives on how and why reverse transfer is being emphasized at that level.

  • Greater understanding of institutional level experiences with implementing reverse transfer.