Health Care and Education Tranisition Research

Practical Applications of Confidentiality Rules to Health Care Transition Instruction Jeanne B. Repetto Robert W. Gibson Joyce H. Lubbers Sheila Gritz John Reiss Abstract The increase in the number of students with disabilities and special health care needs and their need for health care transition (HCT) creates opportunity for education and health services professionals to work together. In response to this opportunity, the authors developed an HCT teaching module for 6th to 12th graders. A concern that surfaced during the project was the sharing of personal health information by students during health-related instructional activities. The authors’ concern evolved into a review of the confidentiality guidelines found in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004, Family Education Rights and Privacy Acts of 1974, and Health Information Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 and their relationship to educational activities. This article describes what the authors discovered and its application to HCT instruction.

Click here to read the article!

A Statewide Study of Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Health Care Transition Jeanne B. Repetto Robert W. Gibson Joyce Lubbers Sheila Gritz John Reiss Abstract In this article, the authors present the results of a survey of interagency transition council members that assessed familiarity with health care transition (HCT) and the inclusion of HCT-related goals in individualized educational plans (IEP). School personnel, agency representatives, and family members completed a total of 187 surveys. Respondents reported limited knowledge of HCT, and HCT-related issues were often not addressed through school-based transition activities. Respondents, however, reported a high level of interest in learning more about the issue of HCT. Implications of this research include the need to provide additional training to schools, agency representatives, and family members regarding the importance of expanding current educational transition practices to include HCT.

Click here to read the article!

Expanding Transition to Address the Needs of Students With Invisible Chronic Illness Jeanne B. Repetto, Ph.D. Susan Chauncey Horky, LCSW Angela Miney John Reiss, Ph.D. Arwa Saida, MB BCh Lisa Wolcott, MSW Pablo Saldana, LCSW Jennifer M. Jaress, Ed.S. Abstract: Many children with invisible chronic illnesses (ICIs) are living to adulthood, necessitating that they prepare for their future. Health care and education systems have different meanings and processes for transition, although both systems are designed to help young adults prepare for independence. As health care and educational services support and educate each child and the adult he or she will become, it makes sense for these systems to coordinate their services to improve student postschool outcomes. This article addresses the importance of coordination and collaboration between health care transition and education transition for youth with ICI. The authors present a model that may be used to guide the efforts to coordinate these two forms of transition along with recommending preliminary steps that can be taken to facilitate this merger. Published online before print January 18, 2012, doi: 10.1177/0885728811423653 Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals May 2012 vol. 35 no. 1 4-13

Click here to read the article!

This is another article our team has written in regards to EdHCT. Please find the abstract below and a link to the website. Jeanne B. Repetto, PhD Jennifer Jaress, EdS Jenna Lindsey, EdS Jungah Bea, MA Abstract The purpose of this study was to assess the inclusion of health care components in transition Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) for students diagnosed with Other Health Impaired (OHI). In this study, we analyzed 50 IEPs of students with an OHI diagnosis to establish whether there are health-related components or other common health care themes. Our data indicated that even though IEP team members noted detailed health concerns on the IEPs, it is unclear whether they considered these concerns in planning for postsecondary outcomes. Data from this study support a disconnect between knowing health concerns are present and needing to be addressed but not taking them into account in transition planning.

Click here to read the article!

In this White Paper information is presented on the necessity for and implementation of Education Healthcare Transition (EdHCT). Recommendations are given to foster the collaboration between the education and healthcare transition processes necessary to implement EdHCT. Education Healthcare Transition (EdHCT) refers to a collaborative process in which the fields of healthcare and education work together to help prepare youth for all aspects of adult living. EdHCT is based on the premise that a young person with a health condition does not (cannot) segment life into “health” and “education/career.” For people with chronic illnesses health and health management are integral to all aspects of life. Thus health must be integrated into all components of preparation for adult living and adult lifestyle must be adapted to health needs. This White Paper emerged from the work of The Interdisciplinary Collaborative on Healthcare and Education Transition (ICHET) https://education.ufl.edu/education-healthcare-transition/ichet/ – a collaboration between the University of Florida’s Colleges of Medicine and Eduction.

Click here to read the article!