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McFarlin, Isaac, Jr.



Assistant Professor
School of Human Development and Organizational Studies in Education

College of Education
University of Florida
imcfar@coe.ufl.edu

Research Biography

Isaac McFarlin Jr. is Assistant Professor of Education and Economics in the College of Education at the University of Florida. He is also Affiliate Assistant Professor of Economics in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. His scholarship focuses on the economics of education and labor economics, and public economics. Before joining the University of Florida in 2016, Dr. McFarlin was an assistant research scientist at the University of Michigan and assistant professor and lecturer at the University of Texas – Dallas.

Key Professional Appointments

Affiliate Assistant Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, University of Florida (2017–present)

Assistant Research Scientist, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan (2010–2015)

Postdoctoral Fellow, National Poverty Center, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan (2007–2009)

Assistant Professor of Economics, School of Economic, Political, and Policy Sciences, University of Texas-Dallas (2004–2007)

Lecturer, School of Economic, Political, and Policy Sciences, University of Texas – Dallas (2002–2004)

Faculty Research Fellow, National Bureau of Economic Research (2017–present)

Research Associate, Texas Schools Project, University of Texas at Dallas (2002–present)

Representative Publications

“Investing in Schools:  Capital Spending, Facility Conditions, and Student Achievement,” Paco Martorell, Kevin Stange, and Isaac McFarlin. 2016. Journal of Public Economics. Vol. 140, pp. 13-29.

“Percent Plans, Automatic Admissions, and College Outcomes.” Lindsay Daugherty, Paco Martorell, and Isaac McFarlin (equal authorship). 2014. IZA Journal of Labor Economics.

“Help or Hindrance? The Effects of College Remediation on Academic and Labor Market Outcomes.” Paco Martorell and Isaac McFarlin (equal authorship). 2011. Review of Economics and Statistics. 93(2): 436-454.