Portfolio

Active STEM Education research grants

UF College of Education faculty and their graduate students are aggressively pursuing vital research, crossing multiple disciplines, that is making a dramatic impact on teacher preparation, teacher practice and student learning in the vital STEM disciplines–science, technology, engineering and mathematics. That focus is evident in the volume and quality of our grant-funding research projects and programs devoted to STEM education.

UF education faculty currently hold STEM education-related grants with a combined value of more than $17.7 million. Here is a sampling of our current active STEM education-related grants (announced as of February 2014), leading off with the most recently awarded grants.

In Progress

GatorSTAR: A New MARC U*STAR program at the University of Florida

  • Date Projected: 10/10/2015-10/15/2015
  • Client: David Julian
This collaboration begins in May 2016 and focuses on providing STEM students who enter UF after attending the local community college and providing research experiences as part of their undergraduate experiences.

NSF funded.

Collaborative research: Testing for functional and genetic independence of rapidly evolving lifecycle components in the apple maggot, a model for seasonal adaptation.

  • Date Projected: 5/2012-5/2016
  • Client: David Hahn
This collaboration involved training postdoctoral students in research on insect dormancy.

NSF funded.

Evaluating Opening New Charter Schools

  • Date Projected: 6/2011-1/2016
  • Client: David Miller
Evaluating charter schools and the process of funding.

Funded through the Florida Department of Education.

Virtual Environments for Therapeutic Solutions (VETS) mTBI/PTSD

  • Date Projected: 3/2011-3/2016
  • Client: Charles Levy
This collaboration involved using virtual environments for therapy for returning veterans with mild Traumatic Brain Injury or PTSD. Funded through the Veterans Administration.

On Extension

Guided Inquiry in Diverse Settings

  • Date Projected: 10/10/2015-10/15/2015
  • Client: Elliot Douglas
This collaboration examined varying curricular methods of instruction in engineering. As evaluator, we examined the effectiveness of new instructional methods in engineering based on a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design.

NSF funded.

Finished

Catalyzing institutional change in STEM education at the University of Florida

  • Date Projected: 10/2011-10/2015
  • Client: Provost Joseph Glover
This collaboration focused on STEM graduate student professional development and other experiences that were offered to graduate students campus wide in ethics, grant writing, presenting research, teaching, mentoring, and study abroad.

NSF funded.

LOCUS: Levels of Conceptual Use of Statistics

  • Date Projected: 10/2012-10/2016
  • Client:Tim Jacobbe
This collaboration developed high school statistics assessments.

NSF funded.

Partnerships for International Research and Education: Collaborations with France and Japan on Complex and Multiphase Fluid Technologies

  • Date Projected: 9/2009-9/2014
  • Client:Raja Narayanan
This collaboration training of doctoral students in a multi-national collaborative.

NSF funded.

Collaborative Strategy Project: science to Systems to Sustainability : Stimulating STEM Career Interest through Cyber-Enabled Water Conflict Resolution

  • Date Projected: 5/2010-5/2014
  • Projected Awarded: $43,315
  • Client:Lynda Hayes
This collaboration public school education program enabled through cyber focus on water conflict issues.

NSF funded.

Science for Life

  • Date Projected: 2005-2013
  • Client:Ben Dunn
This collaboration examined new methods for instructing undergraduates in the sciences. The eight year project included lab experiences that combined multiple sciences: biology, chemistry and physics. Funded through Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Post Doctoral Research Training Fellowships in Early Intervention and Early Learning in Special Education at the University of Florida

  • Date Projected: 9/2010-9/2014
  • Client:Patricia Snyder
This collaboration worked with postdoctoral fellows in research and evaluation. Funded through the Institute for Education Studies.